Tag Archives: wandering

Dementia and Wandering: Suggestions for family caregivers

Most persons with dementia wander, and this can traumatize the patient and the family. Some patients are not located for days, and some get seriously injured, even die. The English and Hindi videos on this page discuss ways in which families can try to understand what needs or restlessness makes patients wander, how to reduce wandering, and also how to be prepared to get the patients home safe and fast in case they do wander.

The videos use pictures and sketches to explain the suggestions. Captions are available.

Read the full post here : Dementia and Wandering: Suggestions for family caregivers

Early warnings, diagnosis, medication, side-effects, an elderly father as caregiver: a daughter talks of her mother’s dementia

Mala (name changed) has a mother suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease, something the family found out only after years of watching her slowly-increasing forgetfulness. Care is being given by Mala’s father, who refuses help. In this interview, Mala goes down memory lane to describe the early symptoms, the diagnosis and treatment, the family’s coordination for the care, and Mala’s own hope and guilt.

Please share something about your family.

Daddy (now almost 80 years old) is my mother’s caregiver, and while we all try to support him in various ways, he insists he does not need more help right now, and will ask for help if he needs it.

We are three siblings; I have two elder brothers and I am the youngest. Our family is an upper middle class family, and we are all educated and pursuing good careers. Daddy retired over a decade ago, and Mummy was a home maker. All of us currently live in the same city; my eldest brother and his family lives at some distance, my other brother and his family live next door to my parents, and I live with my in-laws just a few minutes of walking distance.

Daddy (now almost 80 years old) is my mother’s caregiver, and while we all try to support him in various ways, he insists he does not need more help right now, and will ask for help if he needs it.

Tell us about your mother before the symptoms started.

Mummy was what we would probably call an ideal homemaker. Though a graduate who had worked for some years, she was happy to leave her job and switch to full-time home making. My father, a quiet man, worked at his job, earning money. Mummy was the one who was always there for us, her children, when we were younger. She loved to cook for us. She was very social, and was prominent within our community for her participation in various group activities.

Read the full post here : Early warnings, diagnosis, medication, side-effects, an elderly father as caregiver: a daughter talks of her mother’s dementia

Care in a dementia day care centre: a social worker explains

Jincy Shiju is a social worker at Dementia Day Care Centre, Bangalore (a service run by Nightingales Medical Trust). Currently, the centre services six dementia patients for day-time care on weekdays. The activities of ARDSI Bangalore Chapter are also carried out through the Centre.

What steps do you follow to admit a patient for the day care facility?

When a client’s relatives approach us for day care facilities, we first ask them to get the client be assessed by our doctor. During this assessment, our doctor checks the client’s current status and identifies which areas to focus on during rehabilitation and care. We next gather information about the client from the client’s family, using our “client social profile” format, and we sit with the family to get clarifications and additional data about the client.

At the end of this information-gathering, and before we take in the client for actual care, we are therefore well informed about the client’s personal and social history. For example, we know:

  • Client’s personal history, such as preferred name, school/ education, occupation, cities lived in, languages known, family details (such as spouse, children, grandchildren and others), friends/ neighbours, pets
  • Special memories and anecdotes
  • Social involvement, such as whether the client likes to socialize, social activities enjoyed, etc.
  • Emotional habits, such as how the client expresses emotions such as joy, sorrow, does the client like to be touched/ hugged, how the client expresses frustration
  • Religious beliefs and habits
  • Behavior challenges
  • Routine the client is used to

Read the full post here : Care in a dementia day care centre: a social worker explains

Voices: Caregiving in the news

This page provides links to some online news reports, articles, and personal essays that include dementia caregiver stories from India. They provide an insight into real-life experiences of dementia situations here, the challenges faced, what families do, problems due to lack of information and poor awareness in society, and the use or limitations of various support mechanisms, etc. Articles have been selected to provide a cross-section of recent caregiver experiences and are arranged by their main theme for the convenience of the reader. Themes include: Wandering, Early onset dementia, Elderly caregivers, Decisions and experiences around using care homes, day cares, and attendants, “Remote” caregivers, arrangements, and guilt, Diverse care situations, symptoms, challenges, introspection, comments, and Personal blogs that span the entire dementia experience.

Read the full post here : Voices: Caregiving in the news

Special tips for challenging behaviors: wandering, incontinence, repetitions, sundowning

Changed behaviors are common in dementia, and some of these are worrying because they can harm the patient or others. Some common difficult behaviors seen are wandering, incontinence, repetitions, and sundowning.

What caregivers can do: Understand typical triggers for such behaviors. Observe the patient for possible causes. Evaluate special tips suggested on this page, available in books, and in support groups. Decide on a suitable approach and try out changes. Keep observing what happens and adjust the approach as needed.

A patient’s behavior depends on the state of the patient’s dementia, on what is happening, on the patient’s needs, surroundings, and other factors. You can use changed behavior to understand the patient’s situation, abilities, and needs. Once you understand what is causing the behavior, you can find creative ways to cope. The page, Handling Behavior Challenges, discussed a general approach for changed behavior. This page discusses some specific worrying behaviors seen in many patients.

  • Wandering.
  • Incontinence.
  • Repetitive behavior.
  • Sleeplessness and Sundowning.
  • Links for some other unusual and challenging behaviors.
  • See also….

Read the full post here : Special tips for challenging behaviors: wandering, incontinence, repetitions, sundowning